92. Why do we feel pain?

92. Why do we feel pain?

Dear Sara, Pain is unpleasant, but we need it for survival. Just the other day I was out exploring when I stubbed my paw and let out a big meow. My nervous system was doing its job. Part of the reason we feel pain is because our bodies have tons of nerves that help us...
91. How does a car work?

91. How does a car work?

Dear Jordan, As a cat, car rides can sometimes make me feisty. But as a scientist, it’s fascinating to learn about the mechanics, engineering, and chemistry fueling the cars humans drive every day. First, the gas: Gas is stored in a tank. When a driver pushes down the...
90. A win-win for farmers and slowing climate change

90. A win-win for farmers and slowing climate change

PULLMAN, Wash. – Climate change is already transforming agriculture in Washington. To help farmers deal with climate change, Bill Pan, a Washington State University professor of crop and soil sciences, is talking to them about ways to both adapt to changes and slow...
89. Kuiper Belt – What is it?

89. Kuiper Belt – What is it?

Dear Zaara, You might say the Kuiper Belt is the frozen frontier of our solar system. Out beyond Neptune’s chilly orbit, this saucer-shaped region is home to Pluto, billions of comets, and other icy worlds. “The Kuiper Belt is really the edge of knowledge,” said my...
88. Till Tomorrow

88. Till Tomorrow

Agricultural research shifts to the LONG game As David Huggins looks out across the rolling hills of the R.J. Cook Agronomy Farm at Washington State University in Pullman, his enthusiasm about soil is tempered with a sense of urgency about the future of agriculture....
87. Addressing Food Safety and Preventing Disease

87. Addressing Food Safety and Preventing Disease

Washington State University researchers have developed a portable biosensor that makes it easier to detect harmful bacteria. The research team, led by Yuehe Lin, professor in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering and the Paul G. Allen School for Global...